The Camino Trail: Convertible Pants, and other Packing Tips

I recently had a conversation with another hiker about convertible pants. Yup, the ones with the horizontal zipper (or Velcro strip) allowing the pants to instantly become shorts. Attractive, right?  She said that they are a fashion faux pas and must NEVER be worn….not even on the Camino. I said that I would not do a long distance hike without them. We each paused…and agreed to disagree.

Google ‘convertible pants’ (aka zip-off pants or shants) and you’ll find loads of controversy….most of it erring on the ‘practical’ but ‘dorky’ side. Whatever! The beauty of a long-distance hike is to free ourselves from the expectations of others.

This debate is a good analogy to packing for the Camino (or any other long, lodge-to-lodge hike).  As much as you research, there is no ‘perfect packing list’ that fits all. One person’s ‘must have’ is another person’s ‘never ever!’

But, there are good packing guidelines that can help. Below are some that I use.

1. Know your priorities and what works for you. No two packs will ever look exactly alike, nor should they.

2. Take only what you need. Go for multipurpose items whenever you can (e.g., a light-weight scarf can be a sarong, head-cover, pillowcase, sheet, privacy curtain, towel….you get the idea). Leave ‘just in case’ items behind. You can buy or replace needed items along the way. Leave your jewelry at home as well. It will give extra peace of mind.

3. Go with the lightest equipment possible.  As a rough guideline, your backpack should be no heavier than approximately 10% of your total body weight. With this in mind, EVERY ounce counts. Good options include carbon trekking poles and rugged but lightweight trail shoes and backpacks. Don’t leave out the hip-straps. They keep the weight off your shoulders and distribute the load more efficiently. In summer, consider a sleeping bag liner instead of a full sleeping bag. Also (carefully) cut tags out of clothing and equipment, and eliminate/reduce packaging wherever you can.

4. Bring TWO sets of clothes and plan around them. If you’ve never done this before, I can hear you shrieking from here. But, with the right two outfits, this is much easier than it sounds. Doing laundry after each hike quickly becomes routine, and can be a social gathering time. It is essential to choose fabrics that wick away sweat and are fast drying — NEVER cotton!

5. Take Care of Your Feet. It’s easier to prevent blisters than to treat them. DON’T scrimp on socks. Choose ones that are high quality, purpose-made for long hikes, and quick drying. Don’t forget sock liners. Break new shoes or boots in for at least one month in advance. Consider trail shoes rather than boots; they’re lighter-weight with fewer contact areas on your feet and ankles, yet still offer good support for most terrains.  My one extra pair of shoes are waterproof Teva sandals. They are cool and comfortable for evenings, but still rugged enough to walk a few sections of the trail when my feet need a break.

6. Light Plastic Bags, Elastic Bands, and Safety Pins are Life-Savers. Together, and alone, they have a variety of uses. They can replace compression sacks, remove unnecessary packaging, serve as clothes pins and help keep things dry.

7. Treat your backpack and boots/shoes in advance so that they are resistant to both water and insects. Again prevention beats the cure.

8. Pack well in advance and test EVERYTHING that you will be bringing. Preparing your pack one month ahead may seem overly nerdy, but it gives you time to unhurriedly consider what you have in your bag, and make any necessary adjustments. Last minute packing can lead to poor decision making….and unnecessary stress.

9. Use a Kitchen Scale to Weigh Each Packed Item. As overkill as this may sound, It’s an important step to achieving the lightest pack possible. You’ll be surprised at the weight of some single items — which may help you to consider more appropriate alternatives.

10. Have a critical friend review your draft pack. My critical friend is Richard. He questioned my sports bra (funny his first focus should be on that)! He was right, I never usually wear one — and it’s bulkier and much heavier than what I typically use for hiking. He also suggested that I go with shorter hiking socks and liners. I love my thick and comfy crew socks — but they may not be worth the extra weight and bulk — and they are undoubtedly more difficult to pair with shorts. Richard stayed clear of my converter pants. Wise man!

My revised draft pack now weights 5 kilos (11 pounds). I was hoping for a half kilo less to allow more leeway for water and snacks…or any forgotten item. Time to sneak my first aid kit into Richard’s pack. Sharing is caring!

Do you have any tips to share on packing light?  I’d love to hear them.

 

84 Replies to “The Camino Trail: Convertible Pants, and other Packing Tips”

  1. You’re doing great! A five kilo bag doesn’t seem too bad. I understand it might get doubled with food and water, though. What a good idea to have a “critique partner” for your bag. And I agree, every ounce matters.

    Funny you mention convertible pants, as I’ve been trying to buy a pair on Amazon for ages and they never seem to fit right. This is now the third pair that has to go back. I’ve decided to try a male version next.

    I used to have one when I was in my twenties and backpacking for a year. The only negative I ever noticed was that I wore the shorts part more often, so it faded and became a different color than the zip-off parts. How could anyone not love them? 🙂 Of course, I never take fashion into account and am all about comfort.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi, Liesbet – You, Kathy and Sue are fast. I just pressed “publish,” went to get a drink of water, came back, and all three of you had already replied! Have I mentioned that I LOVE this little corner of the blogosphere?!
      Thank you for your kind word of encouragement. A 5-kilo backpack is wonderful, as long as not too much more needs to be added. On our Spanish Caminos, I seldom carried more than 1 L/Kilo of water at a time because there were frequent spots to get water along the way, and these spots were shown on our map. I believe that there are longer stretches without water along the VF — but hopefully they are not too much longer.
      Ironically, the thing that I love most about my convertible hiking pants is not that they are convertible (although that is a great feature). It’s that they are so lightweight, with pockets just the right depth and non bulky. They have also done my past Caminos with me, so I’d hate to leave them behind on this one. I’m the opposite of you, I wear them as pants more often, and they are already very light-colored, so fading has not been a problem. Good luck in finding your perfect pair — I’m sure that they are out there!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You posted at the right time. Right before bed time. And, I’m in a house again with WiFi. So, I’m back in the blogosphere! Yay. No rush or stress or losing the connection for a while. And, I agree, it’s so nice to be among friends. Sometimes this happens right after I post a blog as well and I love it. Have a good night!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Hi, Liesbet – I used to schedule my posts to go out at 5 a.m. once a week. In that way, I thought I could better compare post stats. I haven’t checked my blog analytics for months. I now post whenever I have finished writing. For me, this has been incredibly liberating. Enjoy your time at your pet-sit, with ‘no-rush, no-stress’ wifi!

        Liked by 2 people

      3. Hi, Donna. I’m not much of an expert on hikes or packing (though I trust you’ll post a pic of those convertible pants!), but I am taking note of your new freedom from blog statistics and just posting whenever you feel like it. I raise my virtual glass to you on blog freedom 🙂 Enjoy your trip and please be safe. – Marty

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Hi, Marty – Freedom from blog statistics and self-imposed schedules has worked well for me (at least so far). Hopefully, this works out well for readers too.
        I did try to show a picture of my convertible hiking pants in the feature photo. But, WordPress cut them off just below the waist. At least you can see what colour they are, and what the waistband looks like! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi Donna! Good for you for wearing what works for you rather than what anyone else thinks is appropriate….and wow! I can’t even imagine someone thinking that you couldn’t wear what you want on your camino walk!!! As for packing so light, I am in deep admiration. When we come north this summer we are driving the SUV and yeah, it will be loaded with all my goodies. What is the saying, possessions expand to the space you allot. Thank goodness I have a small home! ~Kathy

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi, Kathy – I thought that was a bit strange as well — especially coming from a fellow Camino-hiker. In situations like that, agreeing to disagree is often the best option.
      I agree with your saying about possessions expanding to fill the space that we have. The exact same thing happens with time.
      I am super excited about your visit this summer. When you travel in a SUV all rules of light-packing are off! 🙂

      Like

  3. Several years ago I did a 4 day walk through the Blue Mountains in NSW, Australia. It was gorgeous. Well I obviously didn’t read the style memo because I wore the convertible pants. I had some great hiking books and had a wonderful time. You must be getting so excited, Donna and you have provided some very sensible tips for packing. I’m not sure I could carry that backpack though it looks as tall as me! LOL:)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi, Sue – Hiking through the Blue Mountains in NSW sounds absolutely amazing. There are so many different hikes that I want to do that I’m not sure how I will every squeeze them all in. I have a very long Bucket List!
      I believe that the photo of my backpack is deceptive. It is actually considered a day-pack so is quite doable to carry — at least when not over-stuffed!
      Thank you for all of your tips for #ActiveApril. I have been greatly enjoying them.

      Like

  4. Hi Donna! I love this sentence “The beauty of a long-distance hike is to free ourselves from the expectations of others.” This was my biggest take away from trekking in Nepal and in the jungles of New Guinea. I think it was also liberating for me not to worry about how I looked, what I was wearing – but to be able to do it in my own way! I love your practical guide to packing and think you’re doing so well to keep it down to that weight! Great to read and I’m getting excited for you 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. HI, Debbie. I used to straighten my hair every day starting at age 11 and ending at age 50. I did my first Camino when I was 50 — no blow-dryer, no special hair products. At the end of that hike, my husband said: “your hair has never looked so good.” It was a profound lesson!! I haven’t straightened my hair, or fought against who I truly am, since.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I am always profoundly amazed with how little you manage to get by on Donna. Your list was really interesting – I’m never going to be walking any trails the length that you tackle, but it’s always fascinating to see the background details of the process. Happy packing for the next big one soon x

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Leeann – When I first moved to Beijing (18 years ago), I was a complete “just in case” over-packer. This was also fuelled by my fear that I could not get many specific products in China (including shoes in my size). When traveling from China, I overpacked because I believed friends and family wanted and needed the latest knickknacks from Beijing (news flash to me: they usually didn’t). It’s funny when I think about it now. Once I began packing light (9 years ago), it steadily became addictive. Now when I have to carry more for travel, I’m incredibly uncomfortable.

      Like

  6. We are heading off to Bendethera in two days time. Access is 4 wheel drive only with Creek crossings. It will be cold and we will be camping in a tiny tent. We are wondering if the car will hold all the extras we are taking. Shower tent, portable toilet, esky, battery fridge, table, chairs, inflatable mattress etc. I have also been shopping and bought far too much food. Bendethera is in the Deuwa National Park and the nights are cooling down.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi, Linda – Thank you so much for stopping by. Deuwa National Park sounds like an amazing trip. I tried to be careful in my post to say that my list was for “long distance, backpacking, lodge-to-lodge” hiking. I agree that packing for your type of trip takes a very different skill set — a skill set that I don’t (yet) possess. Will you be blogging from the road or have you scheduled your A – Z posts ahead of time?

      Like

  7. Good advice… but no cotton?!! Oy vey I live in cotton. I imagine the weight issue is the one I’d obsess on. A question: what do you about toiletries? I’m allergic to about 99.9% of the soaps and shampoos and lotions out there, so I’d want to pack my own. Just curious.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi, Ally – You’ll often see signs in hiking stores saying “Cotton is Rotten” or “Cotton Kills.” Here’s a link that explains why: https://sectionhiker.com/why-does-cotton-kill/.
      Toiletries are generally very heavy, so I bring a few small ones with me and refill as I go. I don’t have any allergies, so that makes things easier for me. On our Spanish Caminos, there were numerous pharmacies along the way where one of the pharmacists usually spoke at least some English and could either help you find what you were looking for or a reasonable substitute. I agree, allergies to 99% of soaps and lotions could be problematic on a long trek. 😦

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hi, Ally – Why cotton is frowned upon by most hikers is that it frequently:
        • Absorbs too much moisture,
        • Is poor at regulating temperatures,
        • Has a long drying time,
        • And becomes heavy when wet.
        If not out hiking, or participating in a hot and sweaty sport, cotton makes perfect sense.

        Like

  8. Great tips here, Donna. You should submit this to some travel magazines. 🙂 Although for me writing, I don’t have a critique partner, I love the idea of one for packing! I’ll admit, I am the worst packer as I constantly over pack.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Great post, Donna.
    I bought a backpack recently, because I’m too short to put my carry-on above the seats in an airplane. The backpack is small enough to fit under the seat. Problem solved, I thought…
    Until I packed it, and put it on! 10 seconds and my shoulders were killing me! I had to switch it out for a backpack with wheels 🙂
    In total admiration here, of your expertise. And strength!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I’m not a hiker so this isn’t a hiking story but a vacation one. I’m terrible at packing for “car” trips because there’s all the room in the car. Every year a friend of ours invites us to a hunting cabin in the summer. It’s lovely with 7 bedrooms and 4 baths but it’s still a hunting cabin, in the humid/damp woods without central heat (and yes sometimes you need it in July). After a few foolish years I have a sheet I read before I pack that says things like “don’t bother with a curling iron because you won’t use it,” “absolutely no shorts or sandals, it’s never that warm,” “take your own soap because they are into stinky herbal soaps,.” and few more. The last paragraph is a lecture to myself to be sure I don’t lapse. When our temps are hitting near 90 it’s so hard for me to crawl into jeans and travel there but I have spent a few miserable trips because my packing was lightweight summer clothes instead of heavier late fall things. BTW LL Bean has those pants that zip off to make shorts. Your guide is a good one and I agree with Jill. You should get it published.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi, Kate – Both you and Jill are very kind. I love the packing note that you have prepared for yourself, equipped with mini-lecture! I agree that it is hard to pack for cooler weather when it is smoking hot. Somehow, it seems much easier to pack the other way around!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Great tips, Donna! I would add especially NO COTTON SOCKS – they will tear your feet to shreds/create blisters on a long hike or run.
    I think convertible/zip-off pants are a great idea. Had no idea they were a fashion faux pas or that fashion was even a thing on the trail. I tried to get a pair for some upcoming trips but couldn’t find any at Eddie Bauer so settled for a pair that has built in tabs so they can be rolled up and easily kept in place, instead. This might prove to be the better idea, I thought later – less fiddling with zippers and having to pack the zip-off portions when not in use. I’ll let you know how they work out!

    Deb

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi, Debbie – I wholeheartedly agree — cotton socks on a long hike are a recipe for disaster! I also had not received the memo that fashion was a thing on the Trail. Apparently, some people do care about this. Your roll-up pants make sense to me — especially since I like to have my legs covered for at least the early morning section of my hikes. I’d be interested in hearing how they work out for you.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Hi Donna – I’d even make a small change to say “The beauty of life is to free ourselves from the expectations of others.” – I totally agree with your packing guidelines. The whole thing about striving for simplicity and lightness are very appealing to me. Every ounce counts and top quality materials of what you bring with you let you enjoy the journey. Do you bring snacks like energy bars, or buy them when you are there? Do you also do hike training now to prepare for your camino walk (e.g. do short and long hikes, add backpacking weight gradually, etc.)? I’m excited for you and Rchard.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi, Natalie – I like your small change — it makes complete sense to me! I don’t typically bring snacks from home..unless there is something particular that I wish to munch on during the flight. It is easy to pick up snacks along the way (or at least it was in Spain). Embarrassingly, I am one of those people who gets cranky when hungry…so my husband usually checks to ensure that I have packed a granola bar or two! 🙂

      Like

  13. I have to laugh about the convertible pants. After failed attempts at using mine, I’ve got them for sale on Poshmark. I just don’t like the feel of the zipper on my thighs. This blog is helpful. I’ve been practicing packing for a trip to Tanzania next month and making adjustments. One thing I’ve done to reduce weight is buy light weight sun glasses. My normal ones, with their case, are heavy! I’ve also invested in some Exofficio undies than can be washed overnight. I am shocked at how much room socks take, but not sure they will dry over night. You’ve got me rethinking my choice of scarf to take. What a great list of uses you’ve provided! Lastly, I’ll be taking some safety pins. Thanks for the tips!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi, Tracy – Thank you for letting me know that these tips were useful for you. I look forward to reading more about your upcoming trip to Tanzania. To me, convertible pants are just like any other pants – some more comfortable than others. The attachment zippers for mine are entirely hidden by the seam and don’t rub against my skin in any way. As I keep them in pant form for the majority of the time, I often forget that the zipper is there — until the hot, sweaty afternoons when I really need them. Then, they are divine!

      Like

  14. I’ll come back and read the comments, they’re always interesting but for the moment I’ll also overemphasise go as light as possible and pack with great care, keeping comfort foremost.
    small transparent ziplocs … for each different item eg pins, plasters, thread, medicines whatever
    Shanks are a great idea .. and a sensible one in my view ..
    disposable throwaway panties maybe
    ziplocs for things almost dry

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi, Sue – Thank you for these extra tips. I agree that ziplock bags come in very handy and have a wide variety of uses. My hiking underwear are super comfy and drip-dry very quickly, so they have never been a problem.
      Thank you for your comment about the comments. The exchange of ideas is always my favourite part of blogging!

      Liked by 1 person

  15. I love convertible pants and was shocked when you said they were a fashion faux pas!

    I am definitely a “just in case packer”! It’s one of the reasons I’ve never done any camping…. I’m a day hiker only so I don’t have to carry anything except what I need for the day. Everything just-in-case says in the car/cabin room. I am not sure I could minimize that much to tackle a hike like you are doing…. but it’s super fun to hear about your prep!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Pat – I was shocked that fashion would ever be a concern on a hike such as the Camino. Different strokes for different folks, I guess. I believe that knowing what works best for us is key. Even though the West Coast Trail is very close by to where I live, I am not a multi-day wilderness hiker. To try to pretend that I was, would make for a very miserable trip! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  16. I’m one of those who starts packing for a trip, building around a specific color perhaps, then I go back and purge and/or add things. Your trip allows for very little change or additions which is a good thing, Donna! I am a FAN of the convertible pants, I have them in several styles, short and capri-length. Why would these be a faux-pas? If my legs are too warm I will DIE, so zipping off the legs is what I need…call me a dork but I will be comfortable! I love all your how-to details for this. I bet you are getting excited!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Terri – Even though I only have two sets of clothes with me, I still went with a colour theme (tan and pink). It was easy to do because those colours seriously dominate my summer wardrobe (black and pink dominate my winter wardrobe)! I agree about the convenience of being able to quickly turn pants into shorts when hiking. As a bonus, my one pair of hiking pants gives me two separate items of clothing!

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Although I don’t own any convertible pants, I agree with you that it’s way more important to pack thoughtfully for specific travel circumstances than it is to worry about fashion. After our blogging get together last October, Paul and I went hiking in Joshua Tree National Park. Both of us wore those dorky sun hats with the long flap in back to keep the sun off your neck. We had several people we met on the trail comment that they wish they had hats like that. In those situations, I worry less about fashion and more about comfort and practicality.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi, Janie – I completely agree. For the trail, I choose clothing that I am comfortable in, are functional, light, durable, quick drying and built for the task of a long hike in the heat. That’s already a very long list, so there’s no room to add fashion concerns (or judgment from others). 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  18. When I did Milford Track and the Routeburn in NZ I walked in gym tights – only because I found the pants uncomfortable. I have quite a high waist which means they dig in…well, that’s too much information. I did the posh option with drying rooms at each lodge & you’re right you very quickly get in teh routine of washing each day. I remember hubby laughed because the waterproof I went with weighed just a 100g than the other one I was looking at – but 100g is a lot when you’ve been on your feet all day. Great tips. I’m so looking forward to reading more!

    Like

    1. Hi, Jo – The Milford Track and the Routeburn sound lovely. Whenever anyone mentions long hikes, I always get “hiking envy”! Walking in whatever is most comfortable overall makes sense to me. And you are absolutely right — 100 g can make a huge difference when you have been walking all day!

      Liked by 1 person

  19. I confess I used to own a pair of convertibles with two zips! They could be shorts or pedal pushers. I didn’t care what they looked like, they were comfortable. However, since having two growths removed from my leg (sun damage when young – I burn so easily) I never now expose them at all. I do sometimes feel weird in climates when everyone else is in skimpy shorts and tops and I have practically every inch covered, but better safe than sorry.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. > She said that they are a fashion faux pas and must NEVER be worn
    I’ve heard Italians are more concerned with fashion than other cultures. So although I generally agree with you, maybe your friend will be right for trips to Italy!

    Like

  21. When my daughter and I planned our Camino ,packing was a big topic of conversation and compromise. My girl is a minimalist (two set of panties was enough for 9 days) . Eventually I settled to keep my pack under 25lbs and was able to pack a day change of underwear.

    Like

    1. Hi, Antoinette – You carried a 25 pound pack? That is very impressive!!
      On my last Camino (32 days of hiking, plus an extra week in Porto and Paris), I only had 2 sets of panties with me. It was no problem at all! 🙂

      Like

  22. Hi Donna, This is the first time I have hear the words fashion and Camino Trail in the same sentence. Comfort, function, quick dry are the priorities. We are lucky we have lots to choose from. And like you said, it is very individual. It’s fun to read sites on how and what to pack.

    We have been on various camping/canoe trips in isolated areas where we had to plan and pack carefully. We always welcomed suggestions. One was how to pack toilet paper. Removing the cardboard roll from the centre and then flattening the roll makes a big difference in size and weight. It’s the little things that really add up.

    I notice you have an Osprey knapsack. I have had the medium day pack for a few years and I love it. As you know, made for women’s bodies and very comfortable.

    I am big on the thicker crew socks (Thorlo) for a few different reasons.

    And Donna, you definitely get the “most organized packer award” when I saw that you place your socks on a kitchen scale.

    I have goosebumps again. I love reading about packing lists and organizing!

    Like

    1. Hi, Erica. It’s incredible how the little things can add up. I agree that if not careful, they can totally take over a pack. I smiled at your comment about me weighing my socks. There is not a single item in my backpack that I have not weighed. That step alone has helped me to make much better decisions. Richard and I are now taking “Italian for Travelers” in Victoria once a week. This has allowed us to get into MEC (and some other specialty hiking stores). This week, I picked up two pair of lightweight “No Blister Guaranteed” socks (by WrightSock). I swapped out my 3.05-ounce longer and bulkier socks for these 1.10 ounce shorter, less bulky ones. Hopefully, these will not only work well for hiking but will be a bit cooler (and less dorky) off of the trail as well! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. A favourite store for me is Robinson’s. The staff is always really knowledgeable. I don’t know whether you are familiar with the upstairs part of this store. It is always my first stop. A lot of great, quality finds if you are lucky with your timing. My husband loves the WrightsSock. My only Italian word is, cappuccino. Have fun!

        Like

  23. How I admire you. Haven’t thought of serious all-day hiking since I was a teen. My father had us train for hiking into the Grand Canyon. Months of walking with our full pack around the neighborhood. Then I got sick when we arrived at the park and all of us except my dad stayed at camp while he went down on burro. And got sick at the bottom. He was so disappointed. I think the rest of the family was selfishly relieved.

    No bra or no sports bra? Cushy socks sound perfect but I imagine lighter material and shorter length might be better. Do your shoes hit above your ankles? We worry here about snakes so I wear ankle boots. But our hikes are nothing like what you are preparing for.

    I would think shants would be a clever way to extend your ‘wardrobe’ and make the warmer days pleasant as well as the cooler nights.

    Like

  24. Hi, Leslie – Thank so much for stopping by. I’m sad for your Dad that after all of his hard work and organization, his hiking plan didn’t work out. Life can be like that, you prepare, prepare, prepare….and still there are no guarantees!
    BTW – I do have a light bra in my pack (1.10 ounces)….just not the Sports Bra (which was much bulkier and heavier)!

    Like

  25. I have never really packed for the kind of trip you are about to embark on, but in general I am a big fan of traveling as light as possible. Scarfs, or shawls (better yet) are definitely my best friend. The problem I am finding now is that we are about to go to different continents, stopping along the way and we need to be prepared for all sorts of weather.

    Funnily enough when we travel in Asia, I never pack for “what if” because I know I can easily find anything and it will probably be inexpensive as well. Whereas when we go to the States to visit family I do prefer to have what I might need as items there are way pricier than in Asia, and secondly I don’t want to take precious family time for going shopping….

    I like your comment about washing stuff out and that being a social activity. Makes so much more sense than lugging stuff around..

    Have a wonderful trip. Interesting post.

    Peta

    Like

    1. Hi, Peta – Thank you for dropping by. When I lived in Asia, I always brought items back with me from North America to Beijing (shoes, bounce fabric sheets, etc. etc.). I was afraid I could not find them in China, or could not find them in my size. Ironically, now that I live back in Canada, I no longer use fabric sheets, and I am content with fewer pairs of shoes! 🙂

      Like

  26. Excellent advice and perfect timing for me. I was just visiting a friend (in TX) who is stressing because she leaves in a couple of weeks for 6 weeks – and 3 weeks of that will be hiking in Spain. I’m passing your post on to her. Thank you!

    Like

  27. Hi Donna,
    Convertible shorts/pants sound like they are practical and “weight saving” as well. Fashion be damned…I have decided I really don’t care what others think…if they are judging you by your “dorky” pants you don’t need them (the people, not the pants) anyway!
    Sorry I am so late in reading this, but the post-sailing jobs really got in the way of me getting to my blog and reading others…and I tried not to stress about it. While you are hiking try not to stress about the online part of you life and just enjoy every moment!

    Like

  28. HI, Nancy – Not stressing about blogging is excellent wisdom that I believe we should all keep in mind. Otherwise, blogging can become a full-time job, which I am sure most of us never intended it to be. I hope that your post-sailing chores ease up for you soon!

    Like

  29. Donna, I pinned this for later reference. Good info. Have you met Abi and Patti over at One Road at a Time. They are about to walk the Portuguese portion of the trail and have offered some great advise as well. I think you guys would have a wonderful conversation about this topic!

    Liked by 1 person

  30. wow – you do some serious backpacking – that is very cool – and I think we live in a day and age where lightweight items are readily available – my spouse hikes (I only do very short ones) and in the 90s he paid a lot more for less – nowadays there seems to be better options

    Like

  31. Hi Donna, We weigh everything too. My husband takes it a bit far sometimes. Our first trek he cut his toothbrush handle in half. It is mentioned in the draft post I am working on at the moment .
    I think those zip off pants are a good idea, not that I have a pair. Packing the pack the month before is a good idea too. I love your hat, it has obviously served you well and is very sun smart. Louise

    Like

  32. Hi, Louise – Reducing every milligram of weight possible can become strangely addictive. Sporting companies have definitely capitalized on this. I was in an Athletic shop yesterday and seriously could have cut the weight of my pack in half by replacing each of my (already lightweight) items with their updated “ultra-light” alternatives (even the hat)!! Good thing common sense took over!

    Like

  33. Looks like you have a good idea of what you will need. I’d have no idea. You’re well prepared though, that I know for sure ♥ Do you take your laptop?

    Like

  34. HI, Dee – Absolutely no laptop — it would be way too heavy to carry and there is seldom wifi anyway. I will have my iphone with me. I use it for multiple purposes — safety, maps, translation, Italian lesson, music, photos, phone and email (when internet connection is available). All of that makes it well worth its light weight! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s