Food, Link Ups

What’s On Your Plate this May? Wordless Thai Yellow Curry.

See Original Recipe Here: Christin at Veggie Chick.
You Will Need: Chickpeas, Bell Pepper, Yellow Onion, Potatoes, Baby Carrots, Ginger, Garlic, Lemongrass, Vegetable Broth, Curry Powder, Garam Masala, Turmeric, Coconut Cream, Peas, Sea Salt, Cornstarch.
Have a question, comment or recipe/dish to share? Please let us know below.
Co-Host: Widow Badass. Read about her delicious Greek Potatoes here.
Feature Photo Courtesy of Ratul Ghosh, Unsplash.

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89 thoughts on “What’s On Your Plate this May? Wordless Thai Yellow Curry.”

    1. I look forward to reading your post. I would definitely love to add new curry recipes to my repertoire. My apologies for my InLinkz being closed when you first read this. All fixed now. I went ahead and added your post there so that other early readers would not miss out.

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  1. It looks beautiful Donna – my only problem is that I think I’m the only person in the world who isn’t a fan of curries. My poor husband has to wait til we go out somewhere to order one to get his curry fix ๐Ÿ˜€

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi, Leeanne – You are definitely not the only non-curry person. Until I began eating more and more meatless dishes, I really didn’t get what all the fuss was over curry. Now I rely on it in our regular rotation. I hope your new job is going well. I look forward to the next update.

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  2. We are very fond of curry dishes and rarely a week goes by without we don’t have one for dinner. This looks like one to try.

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    1. Hi, David – My husband and I regularly make curry as well. It has numerous meatless options, tons of veggies and works easily in our slow cooker. The original recipe calls for sultana raisins to be incuded, which the author begs people not to leave out. I left them out anyway. If you try it, and include the raisins, let me know what you think.

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    1. Hi, Jill – Photos from the author’s original recipe look lighter and thinner coated than mine (and IMO hers is much prettier). But I did leave out the raisins (seriously never gonna happen!) and I purposely made my dish thicker. Thank you for your kind words.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Laurie – Most people might think of curry more as a winter dish. In my defense, our spring weather truly has been lousy — very cool and extremely wet. Hope your weather is good there and that your are getting much deck time!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. When I was a child, I HATED curry. Once a month or so my mom would make a curried chicken dish that I truly could not tolerate. My dad, who believed a person must finish everything on their plate, made me eat it. Instead, I’d race to my bedroom for the night.
    But lo and behold, when I was around 40 years old I braved a restaurant entree called Curried Chicken Salad, which also included grapes and banana slices and strawberries on a bed of lettuce with the curried chicken. Oh my gosh – love at second sight. So, all this to say YUMMM on your offering here.

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    1. Hi, Pam – I love how our tastes change and allow us to try new things. The only dish I remember hating as a child was pork chops (in any form). Sadly, I still don’t like them. Some kids simply never grow up! ๐Ÿ˜€ Curried Chicken Salad with Strawberries and Banana?! I’ll definitely give that a try!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I think that I had a pork chop dinner at a neighbours when I was quite young. Basically it was dried out shoe leather with a can of undercooked, lumpy Campbell’s Cream of Mushroom Soup on top. Truly the stuff that Food Nightmares are made of! ๐Ÿ˜€

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  4. I love curry and as a vegetarian, it is always a great option. It is one thing hubby and I both enjoy. I just throw some chicken in his. This one looks great. Thanks!

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    1. Hi, Darlene – Thank you for stopping by. I completely agree that curries are a fabulous way to cook vegetarian but also sneak some extra protein into those wishing for meat in their meal. Win-win!

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    1. Thanks, Debbie – I started writing this post — and mentioning (in horror) that the original recipe calls for the addition of sultana raisins. Seriously – that is just the wrong taste combination for me. Then the post itself took over (as posts are wont to do) and decided that it would like to be wordless. Who am I to argue with a headstrong post?! ๐Ÿ˜€ Besides, I figured the comments would give me ample opportunity to mention the raisins and see if others feel strongly about this either way.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I can’t believe it used sultanas – I do enjoy them as you know!! Love it when the post takes over and you follow blindly along – that has happened to me before too!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. I do love a curry – the spices, the colour, the comfort of them…and this one sounds like it would be a good one.

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    1. Thanks, Jo – I think that you would quite like this recipe. It would be perfect for a Meatless Monday in Autumn. If you make it, I’d love to hear about the modifications that you make (yup, I know that you would be making them)! ๐Ÿ˜€

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Sue – I love this recipe. Written as is, it’s meatless, low in calories, low in fat, low in sodium, no artifical sugars and is a great base to add more veggies or whatever else you like. It is a wonderful win-win. If you make it, please let me know what you think and what you do differently (and if you add those dreaded raisons)! ๐Ÿ˜€

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  6. Donna, your curry looks delicious. The kitchen adventure this week was brisket, the protein on sale at the local grocery store. As is oft the case, the cooler under the sale sign was empty but the meat counter staff was obliging. In anticipation of house guests later this month, I asked for 2 6lb pieces only to be told that only a 14 lb (!) piece was available. Could it be cut in half? and of course, it could. I found a spice rub on line and put the dry rub on for the night. The next morning, I shared my adventures with my neighbor who put her husband on the phone. He fancied himself a brisket expert (BE). He recommended a bottle of beer in the roaster and concurred with the oven method as it’s easier to control the low and slow temp, Of course I invited them for dinner. 6 hrs later we enjoyed a delicious meal with scalloped potatoes, green beans, lettuce salad. Leftovers were sent home with them and some brisket went into the freezer for bbq buns later. Only one drawback: two cups of fat were rendered off the meat and when the pan cooled off there was a hard candy mess in the bottom of the pan. BE gave me a passing grade but he didn’t stick around to clean the pan which took as long to soak and clean as it did to cook the brisket!

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    1. Wow, Mona, that was quite the culinery adventure! You definitely need a social media account — I would love to see photos (I know that there is a way to do that in WP comments but it continues to escape me unless I post on IG or FB and copy that link). Or — you could add this adventure to the book that I think that you truly should write. I promise to buy an advanced copy!
      BTW – I especically loved the ending of your comment about the passing grade, no clean up help and the time spent soaking and clean the pan. An excelent visual!

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    1. Thanks, Antoinette – Easy and so very doable are the main ingredients of this recipe. I literally rough chopped the veggies, eye-ball measured the remaining ingredients, threw it all in the slow-cooker and let the dish sort itself out from there. Easy-peasy! ๐Ÿ˜€

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  7. I was missing a few ingredients so could not make it the other day but I definitely will be. Thanks for hosting — working on my post. Bernie

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      1. I just read it. Itโ€™s a very powerful post. I havenโ€™t replied yet but will do so in the morning when my brain is in better gear (I am definitely more of a morning-gal). ๐Ÿ˜€

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  8. Hi Donna – I’d put raisins in … and this sounds delicious … I love meat and fruit recipes … Persian influence I think … but I don’t tend to make curries, though am off to lunch with friends who love them. Great fun to see the recipes though – cheers Hilary

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    1. Hi, Hilary – That must be it – I think I’m simply not a meat mixed with fruit kinid of gal – and, truth be told, I am not overly a fan of raisins even on their own. And pineapple on my pizza? Never! Enjoy your lunch!

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  9. Iโ€™d use the pre prepared lemon grass in the tube in the veggie section. I am a fan of Thai curries rather than Indian curries. The yellow is the mildest I think. Thai chillies add heat if needed but start with a very small amount. I add a lot of fruit to my Moroccan dishes, apples, apricots or raisins. Once everything is cooked down itโ€™s hard to pick out any ingredients. And the process will be much faster in the instant pot on Stew. Yes I also leave it all until the next dayssssss..

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  10. This dish is either photographed really well or tastes amazing, or both! I would like to try it but as I mentioned above – the other half (the moth) refuses to eat curries, however mild. Too late to convince him otherwise now. Shame though, as it looks so inviting.

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      1. That makes sense! ESP if allergies are involved
        But I also asked because I am the only one who eats curry and recently found two jars of curry sauce (Costco) and have the option of topping something with curry if needed.
        Not as delicious as this post recipe – but recently added some curry to a bison burger and it was tasty (and different which was nice)

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Bison meat….(I am a huge red meat eater)
        Our local store had prepackaged burgers with bison meat at a nice price!
        So good and the curry was a little weird at first but worked out

        Liked by 3 people

      3. Well in Colorado it is available at more places – and didn’t seem rare
        It is harder to find here so when we saw the sale it was great!
        Although I cannot really tell a difference between bison meat and a good mix of cow meat!
        Taste so similar

        Liked by 1 person

  11. I love the wordless approach – good idea and I might use this for my almond flower blueberry pancake post
    and this dish looks so good and flavorful

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      1. Well the pancakes come out different depending on egg size and even blueberry size – so I might not be able to do wordless
        Oh and they are also ketp – which means rather than a sugar and while wheat traditional hot cake – these are a mini meal – and can be taken as a snack to enjoy cold – as opposed to buying protein bars that are wrapped in packaging and stored on a shelf

        Liked by 1 person

  12. This looks like a terrific curry recipe that I would love to try. Definitely cannot do that here in Mozambique as many of the critical elements would not be obtainable I imagine. But we are both big fans of curries… It is interesting how different curries are depending on the country of origin. Thailand, India, Sri Lanka all have some wonderful ones, all with different flavors.

    Peta

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    1. Hi, Peta – Thank you for taking time from your busy travels to drop by. I didn’t really start getting in to curries until I lived in Beijing — and there I became to love them through two British friends who were passionate about them! I greatly enjoyed your post yesterday and hope that all is well for you and Ben.

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