Parkinson’s Law

I had promised that this post would be about what I did on my Technology Break–the time that I spent luxuriating with family, friends, fiction, fitness, food and fantasies about the Via Francigena. But, after I wrote the title, and published teaser photos, I felt that the rest was self-explanatory.

Adding to my concerns about sounding redundant, when I’ve tried to think of the best way to begin that post — crickets! My mind went blank.

Instead, my brain has been pondering some of the takeaways from my time away. One of these discoveries is Parkinson’s Law. This is the theory that any activity expands (or contracts) to fit the time allocated.  It’s a theory which my husband understands fully, and one in which I remain remedial. If there’s a task to be done that Richard figures should only take fifteen minutes, he leisurely has a coffee, reads the paper, watches the news….and fifteen minutes before he needs to leave the house, he begins the task. He usually achieves his desired goal. No drama, no fanfare.

Remedial me, on the other hand, will begin my task as early as possible. I say that I’m being efficient and want to get the job done and out of the way. But, because I’ve given myself tons of wiggle room, tasks have a way of taking more time than they should. Parkinson found that even straightforward chores increase in complexity to fill the time allotted.  When the same tasks are given a shorter time period for completion, they tend to become simpler and easier to finish. This expansion/contraction can be a benefit, or a detriment, depending on the given situation.

I quickly noticed that Parkinson’s Law also applied to my technology break. As soon as I stopped blogging, and significantly reduced my screen time, summer immediately seeped into the vacated spaces and took over.  I was never once bored or left wondering what I should do next. Like the new retiree who questions how s/he had time to work, I wondered how I had found the time to blog.  As my prime summer activity was spending time with family and friends, this is where my newly released time went. Conversations were rich and unhurried. My multi-tasking tendencies began to reduce. I’m not usually one to use the term ‘mindfulness,’ but I began to feel its presence. Often.

When discussing my technology break with a friend, he commented: “everyone needs Lent –forty days away to help them reflect, refocus and reset.”  Wise words from a wise man.

I valued my technology break, the time that it gave and the lessons that it taught. I am grateful to resume blogging and to reconnect with friends in this community. Friends who share their perspectives on life from around the world.

My task now is to keep this balance and reduce my multi-tasking. As summer is still in full force, and we have additional travel plans, it will be a challenge — but one that I fully accept.

Have you ever taken a technology or blogging break? If so, what was your biggest takeaway?

More photos from my summer camera roll. Yup, there’s been TONS of food!

Feature Photo Credit: Rima Kruciene, Unsplash.

86 Replies to “Parkinson’s Law”

  1. I had never heard of Parkinson’s Law, but it totally makes sense. Instead of taking technology breaks, I have limited my screen time. I used to spend hours reading, writing, emailing, watching youtube. Now I try to limit myself to an hour a day. It’s freed up time for more activities. But, I’m glad you’re blogging again.

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    1. Hi, Karen – It sounds like you have achieved an awesome balance between technology time, and time spent on other activities that you love. This deeply reflects in your posts.
      Thank you for your kind words — its great to be back and catch up so so many amazing people!

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  2. I’ve never taken a break from blogging. If I’m going on vacation, I work like the devil to have posts scheduled beforehand. I know I don’t have to but I like to see accomplishment and blogs are so easy for that. There have been times when I have taken a break from other activities because I needed change or to refocus. It’s always good and when you come back you are refreshed and full of ideas! (hopefully!)

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  3. I haven’t heard this Parkinsons Break. I have taken hiatus only to discover I am more productive when time is tight. Too much wiggle room gives me east access to distractions.

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  4. Hi Donna,
    I’m so glad for you that you took the technology break, and that you are determined to honour its lessons now that you’ve returned to blogging.

    I hadn’t thought of Parkinson’s Law applied to blogging, but of course it works. You begin early and allow the time to fill. My huge failing is that I get lost in ‘clearing the decks’ before I will do something I really want to do. As a result, the really want tos get pushed further and further down the road while I devote hours and days to writing, reading, responding, cleaning out my computer, resetting the books in my library etc, etc ad nauseum, ad infinitum.

    I think it’s interesting that you heard ‘crickets’ when trying to think of how to write about your time away. Maybe that’s one of the biggest benefits of your technology break- that you were able to step back from the trees and see the whole forest. Your perspective on Parkinson’s Law is really insightful and very helpful to the rest of us. Sometimes a break is just the ticket 🙂

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  5. Hi, Karen -Ah, “Clearing the Decks,” I know that routine all too well. This has been changing for me slowly during retirement — but old habits die hard!
    Thank you for your kind words about this post. My mind had planned to write something else, but my fingers typed out something completely different. I believe that you are right about my break offering a change of perspective. I’ve missed you, and your very insightful comments.

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  6. I have naturally been taking blogging/social media breaks as my travel keeps me off-line for extended periods. I create a post when it suits (about one blog a month and a few IG posts in the same period) and then spend the remaining time I have on-line catching up with blogger and social media friends. It takes me longer than I would like to respond to comments and visit on-line friends, but such is the life of a sailor. I may not win any awards or generate income through my posts, but I enjoy creating a ‘logbook’ of my sailing journey and sharing it with friends old and new that I make on-line along the way. I used to be on-line more often, but that lessened the pleasure of posting and traveling. Now I just ‘show up’ when I can and try not to turn my blog into the crazy job I sailed away from in New York.

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    1. Hi, Lisa – I adore your ‘logbook’ of your sailing journeys, and I wouldn’t change a thing about it. Your words are poetic, and your photography is absolutely stunning. Not turning your blog into the crazy job that you “sailed away from” — are very wise words indeed! Thank you for reading and commenting.

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  7. I’m not sure how I’d go having as long a break as you took Donna – maybe I wouldn’t return? So much of my time online is related in some way to my blog and I’m giving it a lot of thought lately. I have my eye set on the end of the year and then there will be a BIG re-think for 2019. I’m not sure if I’ll give it away completely or if I’ll cut back hugely – it will be one or the other because I’m feeling like the well is drying up and there are other things I could be doing instead of the hours on my laptop – thinking, thinking and thinking some more….

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    1. Hi, Leanne – I am a huge fan of Cresting the Hill and would hate to see it discontinued. I understand the long hours (and screen time) that blogging can demand.Sometimes a small change in routine can help us to refresh, rethink and revitalize. I am still juggling to find my balance but feel that I am getting closer. I would be happy to chat off-line if you would ever like to.

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  8. Hmmmm.have not heard of Parkinson’s Law… but think I have used it over the years, at work and at home…I always tried to figure how much time needed and sometimes thought I was leaving to the last minute! Now I find out I was not procrastinating…lol! Glad your back, enjoy reading your blogs!

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  9. While I’d never heard of Parkinson’s Law, it makes total sense to me — perhaps this is why I love a deadline. But I’ve noticed sometimes that when I think I can get it done in the ‘fifteen minutes’ I lose track of time and overshoot the time frame. Thanks for another thought-provoking post!

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  10. Parkinson’s Law is such an interesting theory and time seems to be something that everyone handles differently. I know so many people who always say, “I’m so busy” yet they don’t have a lot to show in terms of accomplishments, except maybe for Facebook comments. For me, the more time I have, the more I seem to waste. Over the years, I’ve learned I work much better on a deadline than when there’s no set date that a task needs to be completed. As for a blogging break, I’ve tried, but I think I’m addicted! LOL! Several years ago, I did take a break from posting over the holidays, but I couldn’t stay away from the blogs I follow. I suppose I was afraid I’d miss something. 🙂 I’m so happy you’ve been enjoying your summer, Donna!

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    1. Hi, Jill – Last summer when Marty, over at Snakes in the Grass, took ALL. SUMMER. OFF. from blogging, I was startled. At that point in time, I could not have imagined doing that myself. It’s funny how some things make no sense to us at certain points in our lives, only to make complete sense at other times. Being honest, I didn’t stay away entirely from the Blogging World. I meet up with another blogger who I hadn’t met IRL previously (Ann from UnRetired). I attended and presented at my WordPress Meet Up Group. I snuck in a spur of the moment request for a Guest Blog (recycling a previous post). And, I read (in paperback) six fantastic books from fellow bloggers…two of which were yours! 🙂

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  11. I haven’t formally taken a blogging break (I started my blog in June, 2017), but I sometimes write fewer posts during a given month than others. I find, if I have nothing that moves me to write about or nothing I think is worth sharing, it’s better not to post than to post about something that isn’t heartfelt or meaningful to me. I know other bloggers don’t necessarily feel that way–and some post every day, even several times a day. I say, whatever works for you, works for me. Other times, I’ll need a week or even more to think about a post and how I want to phrase what I’m feeling. A break can simply exist because new ideas are formulating in my brain. 🙂

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    1. Hi, Cathi – I totally agree with you that it is better not to post than to post something that isn’t heartfelt or meaningful to the writer. Sometimes I have multi-post ideas in my brain, and other times….not so much. I try to spread them out the best that I can. I like your idea of ‘natural breaks’.

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  12. Hi Donna, I love your husband’s style of getting things done. I wish I could learn it. My husband’s style is to start a job, get tired of it, leave it unfinished and then start another one. Works for him but it doesn’t for me. I still make lists but not as often as I used to. I think I am starting to mellow out a little.

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    1. Hi, Fran – Isn’t it wonderful to ‘mellow out a little’ from our hard core working years? Even the ability to shut down and take a break in the time frame that worked best for me was wonderful. Ironically, my ‘self-chosen’ break days aligned perfectly with my previous (international) school’s summer break schedule! 🙂

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  13. My style is somewhat like Richard’s (leave things to the last minute) but, unlike him, I often don’t allow enough time to complete the task. I am overly optimistic in my time estimations. Oh well, somehow I’ve survived this long using this method. I am really considering taking a blogging break… I’m just not sure when. WordPress just informed me that they have renewed my account so I’m entering my fifth year of blogging. I know I spend way too much time in front of my computer and not enough time pursuing other interests. We’ll see…

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    1. Hi, Janis – Congratulations on entering your fifth full year of blogging! I am greatly looking forward to our October Meet-Up. I already have several ‘discussion items’ to add to our list. Now we can add the topic of blogging breaks as well! 🙂

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  14. I’ve taken many technology/blogging breaks over the years. Sometimes for a month, sometimes for a season. My takeaway is that I eventually got bored with only living my life in the real world, knowing that there was a second virtual one at my fingertips. I filled my time when away from blogging, no problem. However, when I came back to blogging I found that I was more alert to the nuances of it, which made it seem fresh and enjoyable again. So I was happy to be back… until I wasn’t again.

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  15. I’m afraid that if I went away no one would remember me when I came back. Plus, I’ve only been blogging a few years now and except for a few months when I have challenges, my blogging is sporadic so I’m not tired of it yet. Nice to have you back, Donna!

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  16. Welcome back

    Judging from your blog post and your beautiful photos you had a wonderful technology break. I like the Lent quote. Words to live by. I’ve not taken an extended technology break, but I do turn off my phone, computer and TV for short periods of time, generally no longer than a day. This seems to help, but then I fall behind on emails, blogs, and uploading photos from my phone. Not feeling very balanced.

    Regarding Parkinson’s Law. My take is this, those of us who have cared for children and family, planned and cooked the meals on a day in and day out basis learned things just take longer. In other words, If you have to stop to change the suddenly dirty diaper or find the lost shoe, and then load the kids into the car getting out the door just take longer.

    Glad you’re back
    Laura

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    1. Hi, Laura – Thank you for sharing this insightful comment.
      When I was a Middle School Principal, our school had “Screens Off Thursdays” — to help our students (at least partly) balance their use of technology. (We were a laptop school). Your idea of turning off technology for short periods of time makes perfect sense to me.
      You’re absolutely right that when caring for others, things can take longer than expected.

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  17. Though I didn’t know it was a “law,” I have noticed how I managed to fill whatever time I allot myself for a particular task. The same seems true of money. If you get a raise, better put some of it away off the top, or somehow your needs expand to spend it all! I’ve never taken a full-on technology break. I did take a 10-day blogging break while I was on vacation. I scheduled weekly “rewind” posts while I was out, but then I couldn’t resist reading and responding to the comments, so I guess it wasn’t a clean break, but it was more of a break than I’ve taken in the past.

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    1. Hi, Christie – I think that Parkinson was a bit liberal with his use of the term “law”. I hadn’t thought of it before, but you’re right, his basic theory also applies well to money! I’m glad that you had a wonderful 10-day break. Very well-deserved!
      PS – I agree that it is hard (if not impossible) to avoid reading/responding to comments!

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  18. Hi Donna, your post was very interesting and I tend to agree with Parkinson. I can relate to your thinking here!! Time seems to have its own way of filling and I understand where you’re coming from in terms of blogging. A blogging break can be scary – will I return or not? – and do I still have anything worth saying? I am on a bit of a break myself but I find I really miss the community of bloggers and their support so I dip in every now and again. All the best to you for the rest of your summer.

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  19. Thanks, Debbie – One of the reasons that I began blogging was to keep in touch with IRL friends after I retired and returned home from overseas. It had never occurred to me that I would meet so many amazing new friends online. You are absolutely right — it is impossible not to miss this awesome and supportive community! Have a restful break!

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  20. I didn’t take a complete break from the blog this summer but I did take a lot of time off, while I recovered from my concussion. I found it refreshing to be on the computer much less, and it gave my mind a rest from daily work on my own blog or reading/sharing others’ blogs. I missed my virtual friends, but overall it was good for me and made me think about my priorities and what makes me happy. I read a lot of books, mostly fiction, and that was fantastic. I still plan to post a weekly essay, but I’m not as driven as I was to keep up with everything. Being on Facebook less has given me more peace of mind and I’m letting go of FOMO (fear of missing out). Now, like you, I want to maintain a better balance.

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  21. Hi, Molly – These were some of my same thoughts and realities as well. I became less driven to “keep up with it all” (which is a miracle unto itself, because I have a “driven personality”)! Turning off my Social Media gave me more peace of mind as well. Cheers to a better balance for both of us!

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  22. I’m someone who likes to get all his jobs out of the way before I sit down and relax, Donna. I’ve never really thought about how long it will take me to complete a job; I just do it and get it done. However, Parkinson’s Law sounds interesting and is something maybe worth trying out. The only problem I can see myself having with it is that if I am giving myself a time frame to do something, then I will rush the job, pat myself on the back for doing it before the deadline, and because I’ve saved myself more time to do something else. Goodness knows what the outcome of the job would be like, though. I think quality would suffer.

    I took a blogging break during the summer of 2016. I informed all my readers that I was taking one, and I did get rather emotional when all the lovely replies came in. It was one of the best things I did, because I got all the jobs done that I had tasked myself to do during the blogging break. I also take mini blogging breaks when going on holiday. I don’t publish new blog posts just before or when on holiday because I like to reply to comments as quickly as possible. The thought of any readers leaving comments and me not acknowledging their comments within 48 hours is something I can’t cope with. I feel they deserve a reply as quickly as possible, just as I do. The thought of them feeling ignored doesn’t appeal to me at all.

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    1. Hi, Hugh – I, too, have always preferred to get my ‘jobs’ done first so I could relax later. The problem for me was that the relaxation time didn’t always come, or was much shorter than originally planned!
      Not long ago you mentioned that inviting readers to comment, and then not replying to what they’ve written, is like inviting friends for coffee…and then ignoring them. These wise words will stick with me!

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      1. That’s good to hear, Donna. You’re always excellent when it comes to responding to your comments and acknowledging your readers. It’s just one of the reasons why your excellent blog continues to grow.

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  23. Hi Donna – I have many thoughts about this post but will try not to ramble here. To answer your questions, when I took my breaks this year, I didn’t post but did read other blogs and sent comments when I wanted to. When I read other blogs and send comments during my trips, it’s because it’s a relaxing activity for me, usually in the evening after an active day, and not because I feel like I need to keep up. I limit my social media presence to fit my lifestyle. I think some seasons like summer and Christmas bring more pressure to bloggers who want to balance IRL and online activities. I look at it as a nice dilemma to have when you’re socially active with friends both IRL and online. Just pace yourself so you can enjoy the experience. Once you have developed friendships, your true friends will always be glad to hear from you, no matter how infrequent you write. I’m glad you took your break and I hope you’re enjoying the rest of the summer.

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    1. Hi, Natalie – Thank you for this very thoughtful and insightful comment. You are right – balancing friendships IRL with friendships in our blogging community is a nice dilemma to have! I wholeheartedly agree with you that true friends are always there regardless of the time apart.

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  24. I heard of this theory in college, when a professor said labor expands to fill the time allotted, in the context of when washing machines were invented and women suddenly had more time (yeah, right). Nice to know it has an official name. Blogging breaks are necessary, and I believe, and have witnessed it, if one doesn’t take even a short one for whatever the reason, the blog suffers, or ends. I know now, with more time, I’m grateful to have and when I’m off from teaching, the time still flies. My break allowed me to recharge and refocus my blog for my photo challenge. Glad you are back and refreshed, Donna.

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    1. Hi, Terri – I greatly enjoy following your Sunday Stills Photo Challenge. Although I understood and respected your decision to take a blogging break, I was DELIGHTED when you returned. There are numerous different ways that we each recharge and refresh. I am a huge believer that this time taken to ‘sharpen the saw,’ offers wonderful benefits.

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  25. Everybody deserves a break now and then. I find myself blogging less … but actually enjoying it more. As for Parkinson’s law, I follow a different code. It’s the dictatorship of the deadline. If I don’t have a deadline, it doesn’t get done. If I had a deadline, it gets done, on time, no problem.

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    1. Hi, Tom – Thank you for reading and commenting. When I began to learn more about Parkinson’s Law, I found it to be highly thought-provoking. But what has been even more fascinating to me has been reading everyone’s different approaches to time management. When I’ve not been given a deadline, I tend to self-impose my own. Old habits die hard! 🙂

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  26. Welcome back Donna! I’m spending less time on FB and other, and I’m finding this suits me temperamentally though at the same time having a bit of an existential crisis about it. Do I stop 100% or 50%? I like the idea of that friend of yours saying about Lent – 40 days to reflect. We were away for most of June and thus I was not available for a few monthly blogging tasks (eg #WATWB); and had less time to spend on my smart phone and/or iPad. I felt the benefits of not being so attached – it was freeing in its way.

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  27. Hi, Susan – Nice to hear from you. I’ve missed you! Did you ever read the book ‘Outliers’? My friend, who made the ’40-day Lent’ comment, is Roger Barnsley, He, and his wife, Paula, are the psychologists behind the core theory on which ‘Outliers’ is based. I agree that his comment about my break was very insightful. I had also wondered aloud with him how I would structure my technology time when I got back. His advice was to do what felt right for me and stick with that…and avoid the temptation to fall back into doing what I think I should do. So far, that advice has worked brilliantly! I, too, have not taken part in WATWBF since last May. The jury is still out on that. Thank you for staying tuned!

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  28. Hello Donna! I’m late to comment because life has been tough and I’m struggling at the moment with some personal issues. The 40-day Lent comment is very wise, isn’t it? I should give that some serious thought. To Parkinson’s Law, if I have a task I like to complete it as soon as I can. Then I know I’ve accomplished what I needed to do. My husband is like yours – he can leave it until the last moment and still get things done. Finding balance for me is a continual WIP. Sometimes I think I have it perfectly in place and then other times the opposite. We have a cruise to Japan in 7 weeks and I must admit I can’t wait to get away and discover a new culture. I would love to feel strong and confident enough to just let the blog go for the two weeks and relax and enjoy. Have a great week and so pleased you had a wonderful summer break. The time certainly flew as I didn’t realise you were away for that long. Lovely to be connecting with you again, Donna and sending love. xx

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    1. Hi, Sue – Sadly your comments continue to go into my Moderation Folder (as do Hugh’s and Dee’s). I have tried everything that I can think off to fix this — but so far no joy! I had written to Jetpack about this several weeks ago but did not receive an answer from them. I will try writing to them again.
      I am so sorry to hear that things have been difficult lately. I will write to you off-line.
      It is exciting that your cruise is now just around the corner. This sounds like an awesome change.
      I can now personally attest that if you take a blogging break, your readers will still be there when you get back. And you may be extra refreshed, with a new perspective to boot!

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  29. How wonderful Donna. You sound positively refreshed and it makes me think I should take more of a longer break. I’ve stepped back a bit from blogging but the lure and pull of it always has me returning. I see it a bit like therapy! 🙂 Great to see you blogging again.

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    1. Hi, Miriam – It is so lovely to hear from you. Thank you for your kind words. My break was very refreshing, although I deeply missed this amazing blogging community. I understand what you mean about blogging often feeling like therapy!

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  30. Hi Donna! I know I’m a little late to commenting but I am actually VERY, VERY happy you are back amongst us! I’ve missed you! But I understand how very important a break can be. And while I’m not taking an official break, I will be traveling for 3 weeks later this month and I have already lined up guest posters to cover my blog while I’m gone. I agree that it’s important for us all to stay passionate about our work….or stop. Right? And as for procrastinating–NO! I feel too much pressure and really dislike that. So by planning ahead I enjoy the experience much more. Different strokes for different folks for sure. Anyway, I too am looking forward to getting together in October. ~Kathy

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  31. Hi Donna,

    Parkinson’s Law makes sense to me. I’d like to try a technology break once I am retired. I have found being more particular about my social media time makes me happier in this era of Trump and Ford. I tend to spend less time on Facebook and Twitter, but still enjoy Instagram. That platform is as yet more positive and upbeat.
    Welcome back! Looking forward to reading more posts from you.

    Deb

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  32. I am well acquired with Parkinson’s Law, but this is the first time I’ve seen it given a name.

    It’s interesting that you should mention a period of “Lent” to reflect, refocus, and reset. I find myself inadvertently doing just that lately and there just doesn’t seem to be any room for blogging in that equation.

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    1. HI, Joanne – I too had heard of the concept of Parkinson’s Law but not the name — until I recently looked it up. Blogging breaks can be scheduled or just happen naturally. I always look forward to reading your posts and will be ready and waiting for when you post again.

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      1. I think I need to learn from the experience of people like you and simply declare a blogging break. I’ve found that my neglect of blogging was too much on my mind for the past couple of months, but it shouldn’t have been. I should have simply been enjoying myself.

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  33. Parkinson’s Law is one of my favourite. It’s so true.

    Regarding technology or blogging break: I haven’t done that for long periods of time, though I know friends who have consciously stayed away from mobile phone and social media for one full month. What I have done is to take limited breaks once in a few days. On such occasions, there will be something — like reading a book, or travelling with family; or some household activity I need to focus on — takes over.

    — Pradeep | bpradeepnair.blogspot.com

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  34. I didn’t realise this condition had a name, but I shall be using it lots! I definitely need to remember this law, because like you, time expands around things that I plan to do. Blogging takes up so much time, that I think a break away would definitely sharpen the sword! #MLSTL

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    1. Hi, Jo – Thank you for reading and commenting. I agree that this is a very interesting theory. I look forward to experimenting with it a bit.
      I sent you my blurb a few days ago. If you didn’t receive it just let me know (my email was a bit wonky as I was traveling at the time). 🙂

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  35. Yes, I did take a break for over a month, it was like 5 or 6 weeks. Spent time away from our home at the beach house with visits from family and friends and especially enjoyed my time with the grandbabies. It’s good to get away and relax with nothing to do but whatever the day brings. No schedules to keep, no particular time to set the alarm clock, etc. We all need it every now and then, it’s good for the body, mind, and soul ♥

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  36. Tasks expand to fill the time available. During my work years, I had too many tasks and too little time, so I tended to be very efficient. But I also was exhausted all the time. A person can’t work at peak efficiency constantly. Now that I have retired, I can experience the elasticity of time without serious consequences. So what if I putter and it takes ten times as long to get a particular task done? I can enjoy being mellow and in the moment. For me, the more important thing is choosing what to allocate my time to, and saying “no” to a lot of things. For example, one item that never emerged from our moving boxes was our iron, and I have found that life without ironing is just fine. Similarly, I have not rushed to volunteer for leadership roles in organizations I have joined. I would rather spend my time in other ways.

    Jude

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    1. Hi, Jude – It’s wonderful to hear from you. You have made many wise points here. There are so many things that were a regular part of my life when I worked (dry-cleaning, ironing, wearing a watch…..) that have not resurfaced in my after-work life. I have taken on some volunteer positions–but so far, none that have to do with education!

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